archive-hu.com » HU » N » NEUROREHAB.HU

Total: 181

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Dear Redaer
    activity The second outcome of the effect of rTMS was beyond 3 months up to 6 months The higher frequencies as 5 or 25 Hz induced increased speed in a movement however the delayed effect was not more than 4 or 6 weeks The focal stimulation over the motor cortex increased the speed of the movement but the wider stimulation of both hemispheres induced a greater symptomatic and prolonged effect

    Original URL path: http://www.neurorehab.hu/rtms/htm/ab_8.htm (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Dear Redaer
    the region of the seizure focus In several ways the changes of epileptogenesis resemble those of long term potentiation LTP that is induced by high frequency electrical stimulation As a therapeutic tool in epilepsy low frequency 1 Hz rTMS can induce a lasting decrease in focal cortical excitability that appears similar to long term depression LTD a reversal of LTP related change that can be induced with low frequency electrical

    Original URL path: http://www.neurorehab.hu/rtms/htm/ab_9.htm (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dear Redaer
    of Regensburg Germany Berthold Langguth MD Department of Psychiatry University of Regensburg Universitaetsstraße 84 93053 Regensburg Germany Phone 49 941 941 2099 Fax 49 941 941 2025 E mail Berthold Langguth medbo de Abstract Tinnitus is a frequent disorder which is very difficult to treat Even if the underlying pathophysiology is not known in detail there is compelling evidence that tinnitus is associated with functional alterations in the central nervous

    Original URL path: http://www.neurorehab.hu/rtms/htm/ab_10.htm (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dear Redaer
    dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or the parietal cortex could be of interest Analgesic effects have been produced by rTMS in patients with neuropathic pain fibromyalgia or visceral pain The mechanisms of action of cortical rTMS in chronic pain are unknown The changes induced by rTMS in neuronal circuit activities may occur both at the site of stimulation and in remote cortical or subcortical structures In clinical practice therapeutic applications of rTMS

    Original URL path: http://www.neurorehab.hu/rtms/htm/ab_11.htm (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dear Redaer
    and in that way enhance the neural plasticity underlying recovery of function The hand motor area has been the main target for applying therapeutic stimulation so far A number of small proof of principle studies have shown a transient improvement of 10 20 in the upper limb function after a single application of RTMS Two approaches have been tested a increasing excitability of the cortex in the stroke hemisphere and

    Original URL path: http://www.neurorehab.hu/rtms/htm/ab_13.htm (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dear Redaer
    few specialised movements In these mildest forms of dystonia recent advances in basic and clinical neuroscience show that sensory and motor systems function abnormally and their interaction to produce voluntary movements is altered As a consequence the motor system is disinhibited the sensorimotor cortical representations are disorganised and the mechanisms controlling neural plasticity in these cortical areas are faulty Accumulating evidence underlines the research usefulness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Original URL path: http://www.neurorehab.hu/rtms/htm/ab_14.htm (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dear Redaer
    assessment that can be used to study the excitability of the human cortex Because it allows the cortex to be stimulated non invasively there has been substantial interest in the possibility of using repetitive TMS rTMS to stimulate cortex Repetitive TMS produces effects which last longer than the period of stimulation The mechanism of these effects are not clear although it is widely believed to reflect changes in synaptic efficacy producing long term potentiation LTP and long term depression LTD LTP and LTD are a part of the mechanisms of plasticity and they play a pivotal role in learning and memory The hypothesis that sleep promotes learning and memory has been studied for a long time It seems that sleep does indeed facilitate learning memory and synaptic plasticity Both rTMS and sleep seem to be able to modify synaptic plasticity There is much evidence that plastic processes during waking and sleep are different Recently it has been proposed that during wakefulness plastic processes producing net increase of synaptic strength predominate During sleep the opposite is true rTMS induced plasticity is also associated to a local increase of slow wave activity during the following sleep It seems that inducing plasticity whatever

    Original URL path: http://www.neurorehab.hu/rtms/htm/ab_15.htm (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dear Redaer
    majority found increased excitability while reduced visual cortical activation was described in some report More interesting results came by studies of plastic modulation through application of repetitive TMS rTMS that induce modulatory effects that last after the end of the train These effects in normal subjects are inhibitory for low and facilitatory for high frequency stimulation Surprisingly we showed paradoxical facilitatory effects of low frequencies rTMS trains in visual and motor cortex We interpreted these effects as following to reduced efficiency of inhibitory circuits unable to be up regulated by low frequency rTMS This was confirmed in motor cortex where through the paired pulse TMS a technique particularly suited to assess intracortical circuits we were able to evidence a reduced intracortical inhibition This was confirmed also by studies with another measure of cortical inhibition the cortical silent period that was found to be reduced in migraine rTMS has been also used to explore another aspect of migraine physiology the impaired habituation to repeated sensorial stimulation The authors found that high frequency rTMS that generally increase cortical activity restore habituation in migraineurs So they confirmed their previous hypothesis that cerebral cortex is ipoactive in migraine Criticism however has been raised about

    Original URL path: http://www.neurorehab.hu/rtms/htm/ab_16.htm (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive